We thoroughly tested the PC version of Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age

Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age is finally available on the computer, which offers the possibility to play native 4K resolution and sixty frames per second. With the PlayStation 4 Pro version operating at 1440p with a 30FPS limitation (and in the default PS4 to 1080p30), this port can offer the best version of the game to date, with all the expectations you have should do. offers a remastering

Similar to Final Fantasy X, the playable mechanics, animation and other fundamental components were originally designed to work with 30FPS, which had to be changed to allow higher frameworks without breaking the game. It's not always a simple task, but Virtuoso Games usually did a good job. The new version for PC works against 60FPS without major problems: the animations move at the right speed, the lip synchronization is fairly well implemented and the playable mechanics move without fail to the top frame rate.

In the sense we stand before a big launch. Play the game at 60FPS, add an extra polished layer that didn't have any of the previous versions. Despite its origins in a title for PlayStation 2 twelve years ago, the colorful art, the unique characters of the characters and the beautiful scenarios support the type in its remastered format. The game also improves with raising the frame rate: the controls respond better, as caba waits, but that's the general fluidity that really changes the experience. It adds an extra layer of refinement that has already been a solid remastering of the classic Square Enix JRPG.

If you have a strong enough GPU, because Final Fantasy XII is surprisingly demanding, you can also play 4K. It offers more sharpness and clarity, with more pronounced detail in the textures when compared to the 1440p image of PlayStation 4 Pro. The difference is not great due to the strong use of depth and other post-processing effects. Undoubtedly, a remarkable improvement is seen even more than with the regular PlayStation 4 after the Pro model.

Click to accept cookies and enable this content

The visual effects have also been restored, with clear improvements in the quality of the shadows and the environmental occlusion. Higher resolution shadows look sharper and have more definition, while environmental occlusion is now being delivered in full resolution, offering more coverage and more accuracy. It is fair to admit that this is a minor improvement, and that the biggest improvement to this version for the computer is the far 60FPS.

It is said that there are some aspects of the conversion that have not been polished and that remove the brightness that this version has over the console version. In some screens, the detail is actually reduced in the computer, with some surfaces not containing the lowest collision reduction apparent on PlayStation 4. That it doesn't happen on the same surface in other scenes of the game, indicates that it's a mistake rather than a conscious decision by the developers. However, the greatest impact on experience is due to the high technical requirements (especially if you have an AMD GPU) and a human system that is clearly designed for PlayStation 2.

The menu is very frustrating when it comes to optimizing the graphics options so that they adapt to your hardware as well as possible. Although a small window allows you to adjust basic parameters before loading the game (such as resolution, frame limit, and overall graphics quality), the full list options can only be accessed through the New Game option in the main menu. possible to make changes to the graphics, return to the main menu and then load an existing saved game, but of course this is not the ideal process. It's a problem because you can't customize the options in real time while you're playing, and make the game your team a longer task than it should be.

If you can put some of these problems aside, the playable experience is great, whether you're playing 1080p, 1440p or 4K native. However, reaching the important 60FPS in a stable way is a bit more complicated, and you'll have to adjust with the graphics options to achieve a good performance. For example, when you play to the maximum with the detail, even a Titan X Pascal or a GTX 1080 Ti 60FPS can't get stable at 4K, and the RX Vega 64 is beyond the reach of that purpose.

It's amazing as we experience a remastering of a PlayStation 2 game and not a cutting edge of the latest technology. Something fails, and after some tests have been done, it is appreciated that some visual effects cause a great punishment in the performance. In this case, the main responsibility is the environmental occlusion. The full-resolution effect is impossible if you want to get 60FPS in Final Fantasy XII, and you will need to reduce it by half to restore performance. Lowering the MSAA from 8x to 4x also helps to earn some FPS, and the image quality is slightly reduced.

After applying these changes, it is possible to play almost stable 60FPS with a GTX 1070 Ti or a GTX 1080. It's not perfect, because there are a few drops, but it can be solved by reducing the MSAA to 2x again or completely deactivating it (you also need your AA supply through post-processing), and reducing the quality of shadows to Medium. It should allow a stable 4K60 with the PlayStation 4 quality options. Unfortunately, it's not enough to reach it with a RX Vega 64. In this case, you must completely deactivate the environmental occlusion and lower the quality level than PlayStation 4

Environmental inclusion kills performance in Final Fantasy XII when playing with 4K resolution. Reducing it by half, as well as shading, and deactivating the MSAA makes it much easier to achieve stable 60FPS in different resolutions.

At 1440p, a GTX 1060 60FPS can offer PS4 quality options. There seems to be enough power to collect the shadows for Alto and the MSAA up to 4x without the frame rate falling into most scenes. With the AMD equivalent card, the RX 580 is more complicated, and even the environmental occlusion can be deactivated, it is not possible to reach the stable 60FPS. This means that getting the quality of the PS4 is a Vega 56. With the use of a RX Vega 56, the quality of PlayStation 4 can play, but only the Vega 64 offers 60FPS completely stable.

Making the game work well at 1080p60 is easier. We've achieved it as much as a GTX 1050 Ti than with a RX 580 with just a few small tires, which keep the shades in Alto and the MSAA 4x. To get 60FPS solid as a rock, you need to lower the MSAA to 2x and shade it to Medium, providing the level of console quality, but twice the frame rate. Interestingly, the maximum frame rate of Final Fantasy XII is that 60FPS, and even the vertical sync is disabled, the stop point is 60FPS.

Final Fantasy XII, in short, has a very high system requirements for what is still a remastering of PlayStation 2, and although 1080p60 plays within reach of current mainstream PCs, it continues as higher resolutions, much work of optimization requires a task that does not make the human system easy. Meanwhile, the performance with AMD (we tested it with two different systems with the latest drivers installed) is extremely low. With a bit of luck it will be fixed in a future patch, but this is something you should consider if you are interested in this version for the computer.

Although the graphical configuration menu and overall performance are far from ideal, the conversion is excellent in other respects. There are no serious issues when playing against 60FPS, and this fluid framework makes the experience better than the one you get with PlayStation 4 or PlayStation 4 Pro. Apart from a bit of a problem with the textures, the PC version of Final Fantasy XII is the best way to play this game … as long as you have the right GPU for this task.

Translation by Josep Maria Sempere.

window.fbAsyncInit = function () {
FB.init({
appId: ‘373195542752803’,
version: ‘v2.7’,
channelUrl: ‘/channel.html’,
status: true,
cookie: true,
xfbml: true,
oauth: true
});
};

// Load the SDK Asynchronously
(function (d) {
var js, id = ‘facebook-jssdk’, ref = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) {
return;
}
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.id = id;
js.async = true;

js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/es_ES/all.js”;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(js, ref);
}(document));

window.fbAsyncInit = function () {
FB.init({
appId: ‘373195542752803’,
version: ‘v2.7’,
channelUrl: ‘/channel.html’,
status: true,
cookie: true,
xfbml: true,
oauth: true
});
};

// Load the SDK Asynchronously
(function (d) {
var js, id = ‘facebook-jssdk’, ref = d.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) {
return;
}
js = d.createElement(‘script’);
js.id = id;
js.async = true;

js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/es_ES/all.js”;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(js, ref);
}(document));

!function (f, b, e, v, n, t, s) {
if (f.fbq)return;
n = f.fbq = function () {
n.callMethod ?
n.callMethod.apply(n, arguments) : n.queue.push(arguments)
};
if (!f._fbq)f._fbq = n;
n.push = n;
n.loaded = !0;
n.version = ‘2.0’;
n.queue = [];
t = b.createElement(e);
t.async = !0;
t.src = v;
s = b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(t, s)
}(window,
document, ‘script’, ‘//connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);

fbq(‘init’, ‘897415313645265’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);


This publication was thanks to EUROGAMER studied from the technology section

EUROGAMER is the largest independent video game site in Europe, with news, analysis, progress and much more

It is a good site at national and international level, visit it for more information.
WE CONTINUE THANKING ALL OF OUR FOLLOWERS AND NEW VISITORS FOR THE SUPPORT THEY GIVE US AND CONTINUE GIVING US.

WITH SINCERITY THANK YOU

DO NOT FORGET TO SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLESTER TO OBTAIN THE LAST NEWS.

ORIGINAL SOURCE LINK EUROGAMER

Leave a Reply