Last Local Texas Post Hate crime increased 226 percent in places where Trump held a campaign rally in 2016, studying claims


US provinces where President Donald Trump held a campaign rally, had an increase of 226% in reported hate crimes over similar counties that did not hold a rally, political scientists at the North Texas University in an analysis The Washington Post.

According to a study by Professor Regina Branton and Valerie Martinez-Ebers and PhD candidate Ayal Feinberg of North Texas University, scientists found that Trump's statements during the 2016 campaign "hate crimes" in the respective provinces.


The study measured the relationship between provinces that held a 2016 campaign rally and measured the crime rate in subsequent months. The scientists used the Anti-Defamation League's chart to measure violence and compared the provinces that had a rally with others who had similar characteristics, including minority population, location and active hate groups.


"We have investigated this question as so many politicians and batsmen emphasize Trump of white-white nationalists," The Post's analysis said.

Only at HoustonChronicle.com: Texas and Houston area cities with the most reported hate crimes in 2017

Branton, Martinez-Ebers and Feinberg noted that their study "may not be sure" that the noticeable increase is attributed solely to Trump's rhetoric. But they also closed the proposal that the reported hate crimes were false.

"In fact, this charge is frequently used as a political tool to dismiss concerns about hate crimes," the analysis said. "Research shows that hate crime statistics are far more likely to be significantly lower due to underreporting."

"In addition, it is difficult to abolish" Trump effect "when a significant number of these reported hate crimes refer to Trump," they continued. "According to the ADL's 2016 data, these incidents included vandalism, intimidation and assault."

Hate crime in the US is expected to increase by 17% in 2017, compared to the previous year, according to an annual FBI report published in November 2018.

Democrats called Trump's rhetoric in collectibles a lot, but he brushed these suggestions.

Following the Christchurch shooting in New Zealand that killed 50 people, Trump said he did not believe that white nationalism was a rising threat – despite proof indicating that far-reaching extremists and white supremacists in 2017 were responsible for more than half of the extremist-related deaths.


"I think it's a small group of people who have very, very serious problems," Trump said on Friday.

"The Fake News Media is working overtime to blame me for the terrible attack in New Zealand," Trump also tweeted. "They will have to work very hard to prove one. So Ridiculous!"

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  • US provinces where President Donald Trump held a campaign rally, reported a 226% increase in reported hate crimes compared to similar counties that did not hold a rally, political scientists said. at the University of North Texas in a Washington Post analysis.
  • The scientists found that Trump's statements during the 2016 campaign might encourage "hate crimes" in the various countries.
  • The study measured the relationship between countries that ran a campaign rally and the crime rate in the months that followed.
  • US hate crimes were expected to increase 17% in 2017 compared to the previous year, according to an annual FBI report published in November 2018.


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